Natural seawater
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  1. #1
    Admin Rich's Avatar
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    Natural seawater

    hello all latest coral mag shows off a norwegan bloke, with a huge tank, very impressive as u would expect. Im always curious on how they create saltwater and what type of elements, etc.....but this guy, lives right next to the sea...and simply fills up a bucket, and does his water changes just like that 100% natural seawater.......tbh, ive never consider such a thing.....although im 2 miles away from the coast. Last time i looked at my coast and seawater, the stuff was very murkey and very green - not really want u want in your aquarium methinks But what do u think.....could one simply go and fill up a bucket of water from the coast!? Hmmmm, well that guy did, and his tank certainly works alright Anyway, thats an interesting thought......

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    Moobaa! zpyder's Avatar
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    Aren't there differences in the chemical make up of the waters found around the UK, compared to tropical areas. EG places where there are coral reefs would have increased amounts of calcium, and with warmer water, a different salinity etc?

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    It's an interesting concept and has been discussed before here >> http://www.tropicalfish.site5.com/tf...ight=sea+water

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    Hot,Cold & Wet ER richt's Avatar
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    Norway probably has cleaner seas. You'd need to know where the currents come from to work out if it was safe.

    Around the UK coast I'd be worried about SG as Zpyder suggests, tropical (planktonic) hitchhikers from the Carribean, ferts and metals. You are in Southampton, a lot of ships dump stuff on purpose or by accident, I'd get a lab to analyze a water sample, but the metals might be quite high.

    I guess you could use UV, nitrogon and dechlorinator to treat the water, but then suddenly it is becoming less free!

    Let us know what happens

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    Mid-morning Malibu? johnt's Avatar
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    Beat me to it
    I think Phil (PAD) got some to test, all results were very favourable, but the general concensus was not worth the risk!

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    Registered User Noble's Avatar
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    I could well be wrong but i think i read somewhere that apart from the red sea the sg levels were the same around the world ?

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    Hot,Cold & Wet ER richt's Avatar
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    Nigel I think it is the average SG that is the same, but areas of sea that have run off from the land can become low salinity. Lagoonal areas will at low tide experience rising SG as evaporation takes effect.

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    Registered User Noble's Avatar
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    UPDATE!!!!

    The salinity of ocean water varies. It is affected by such factors as melting of ice, inflow of river water, evaporation, rain, snowfall, wind, wave motion, and ocean currents that cause horizontal and vertical mixing of the saltwater.

    The saltiest water (40 o/oo ) occurs in the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf, where rates of evaporation are very high. Of the major oceans, the North Atlantic is the saltiest; its salinity averages about 37.9 o/oo. Within the North Atlantic, the saltiest part is the Sargasso Sea, an area of about 2 million square miles, located about 2,000 miles west of the Canary Islands.

    Low salinities occur in polar seas where the salt water is diluted by melting ice and continued precipitation. Partly landlocked seas or coastal inlets that receive substantial runoff from precipitation falling on the land also may have low salinities. The Baltic Sea ranges in salinity from about 5 to 15 o/oo. The salinity of the Black Sea is less than 20 o/oo

    The salt content of the open oceans, free from land influences, is rarely less than 33 o/oo and seldom more than 38 o/oo. Throughout the world, the salinity of sea water averages about 35 o/oo. This average salinity was obtained by William Dittmar in 1884 from chemical analyses of 77 sea water samples collected from many parts of the world during the scientific expedition of the British corvette, H.M.S. Challenger.

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    Moobaa! zpyder's Avatar
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    Cool.
    As part of a unit at Uni on my course I had to review the literature on Shore Platforms, and several journals talked about sub-aerial weathering with salt weathering etc and different salinty water etc

    Also interesting was something mentioned in one of the chem labs, about sand, and how its not actually yellow. The yellow colouration is from rust and similar things like that!

    However I'd imagine if the fish are living in the wild in water with this in, it wouldn't harm them in a tank.

    If I lived in the tropics where there are natural reefs, I'd use the saltwater, but not from here in the uk, unless I had native uk fish etc

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    Hot,Cold & Wet ER richt's Avatar
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    I think the point is that the seas around the UK while similar may not be ideal for certain corals. UK seas favour macroalgae not corals!

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    On A Carnival Ride coveneys's Avatar
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    Would'nt risk it myself

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    Registered User dejavu's Avatar
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    Rich, using Natural SeaWater (NSW) is a very common practice here in Australia, in fact a lot of the guys with large tanks all use NSW for water changes.

    A dude even has a "water trailer", that holds 1000L, with pumps, boeys and all!
    Louis Tsai

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    Admin Rich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dejavu
    Rich, using Natural SeaWater (NSW) is a very common practice here in Australia, in fact a lot of the guys with large tanks all use NSW for water changes.

    A dude even has a "water trailer", that holds 1000L, with pumps, boeys and all!
    Thats the thing though dejavu....we dont have any reefs in our parts u see! No where them....plenty of sand and rocks, but loads of crud and muck I do believe that Bournemouth may well have Cutterfish and tubeworms - quite big ones so they say - but thats about it. And although i live right by the coast, i live near Esso and the Solent....so who knows what crap goes through the channel!

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    AAJ
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    I know of two reefers in this country who use NSW, one in Scotland and one on the South Coast.

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    Moobaa! zpyder's Avatar
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    I suppose you could always argue the toss we're getting plenty of "fresh" sea water from the gulf stream?

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